Cypress Point Elementary installs 'Sensory Path' in school's hallway

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MONROE, La. (KNOE) - The sounds at Cypress Point Elementary School aren't the ones you're used to hearing during school hours.

Courtesy: KNOE 8 News

Since Easter break, hopping and stomping have been the norm, as students pace their way through the sensory path hallway.

"The kids start at one end and kind of work their way through it," speech language pathologist Kristen Mardis said. "And as they do that, it works different muscle groups in their bodies."

The path includes activities like hopscotch and push-ups, helping these students step out of the classroom to keep them a step ahead in it.

"It's good for all of our students, but it's especially beneficial for our kiddos that have diagnoses like Autism, or ADHD, or sensory processing disorder, because oftentimes those kids have an increased need for movement," Mardis said.

And though it's fun, this extracurricular is nothing to laugh at. Just ask Brooklynne Mills. This third grader comes out of class to take the test once a morning and says it helps her pass with flying colors.

"I'm calmer, and I'm not as jumpy," Mills said. "I can stay in my seat and focus a lot more."

And Mills isn't the only one.

James Walker and Antrail Lawson use the sensory path too, and they feel the difference.

"[It keeps me] focused," Walker, a first grader, said. "[I use it] to keep me on track, and to do my work better."

"[I use it] to do my work and pay attention," Lawson, a third grader, said.

But making this pathway took more than a few extra steps. After studying the idea on Facebook, the school had to find the funding. Then teachers and staff worked for days to install it correctly.

They say it's all worth it.

"I think it's just enough," teacher Maggie Generoso said. "It takes two minutes or less to do it. It's not taking a lot of time out of instructional time. To me, I think it's perfect."

A true team effort to put these students in the right place, physically and mentally.