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BBB Scam of the Week: The dangers of voice cloning

Jo Ann Deal from the BBB of Monroe joined with Jessica Torricelli discussing the dangers of voice cloning. Source: (KNOE)
Jo Ann Deal from the BBB of Monroe joined with Jessica Torricelli discussing the dangers of voice cloning. Source: (KNOE)(KNOE)
Published: Feb. 24, 2020 at 7:20 AM CST
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Today’s modern technology has created revolutionary benefits for those who rely on it daily. It has also given scammers the key to access one’s personal information in various ways.

Jo Ann Deal from the Better Business Bureau of Monroe warns of the dangers of voice cloning. That's where scammers record your voice over the phone and use those records to pull off scams.

Most scammers will call asking this question during the call: “Can you hear me now?” Deal advises people not to say anything at all if you happen to pick up a phone call not knowing who on the other end of the line. Deal warns if you do respond, you’re at risk and could be a possible victim of identity theft. She says the scammer can use your voice to access social security numbers, date of birth and address on a simple Google search.

The Federal Trade Commission is currently working on ethical guidelines to avoid voice cloning. The FTC advises contacting your phone provider if the caller appeared to sound like a scammer.

Put your number on the do not call registry. Deal says the do not call registry is still a valid way to keep legitimate companies from calling you. If the call sounds suspicious, it’s best not to respond. If you say anything, you’re at risk.

Go to the FTC

to file a customer complaint.

To learn more about voice cloning visit

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